FutureStarr

Craigslist gangbang

Craigslist gangbang

Craigslist gangbang

Craigslist is advertised as a “social experiment”, and for many people, it is much more than that. And for those who share the fetishistic thrill of community participation, it’s a living nightmare. But for those looking for a good time, or willing to pay good money, it is a frenzy.

Craigslist

Craigslist (stylized as craigslist) is an American classified advertisements website with sections devoted to jobs, housing, for sale, items wanted, services, community service, gigs, résumés, and discussion forums.

Some Craigslist sites cover large regions instead of individual metropolitan areas—for example, the U.S. states of Delaware and Wyoming, the Colorado Western Slope, the California Gold Country, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan are among the locations with their own Craigslist sites.

Having observed people helping one another in friendly, social, and trusting communal ways on the Internet via the WELL, MindVox and Usenet, and feeling isolated as a relative newcomer to San Francisco, Craigslist founder Craig Newmark decided to create something similar for local events. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Around the time of these events, Newmark realized the site was growing so fast that he could stop working as a software engineer and devote his full attention to running Craigslist. By April 2000, there were nine employees working out of Newmark's San Francisco apartment. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Help

Craigslist sexual encounters have reached a whole new level.

Odd perhaps, but no odder than what you see at the most popular job-search site: another wasteland of hypertext links, one line after another, without recommendations or networking features or even protection against duplicate postings. Subject to a highly unpredictable filtering system that produces daily outrage among people whose help-wanted ads have been removed without explanation, this site not only beats its competitors—Monster, CareerBuilder, Yahoo's HotJobs—but garners more traffic than all of them combined. Are our standards really so low? (Source: www.wired.com)

Related Articles