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Collecting Spiderwort Seeds

Collecting Spiderwort Seeds

Collecting Spiderwort Seeds

I am very expert at collecting seed but have not found any in the spent flowers on my spiderwort. I kept checking last year and finally gave up. I want to raise a few more plants. I have an osprey and another. So far they have not reseeded in my garden. Maybe I just keep it too clean, pulling them up before they can develop far enough for me to know what it is. Do new seedlings look like grass?moved to the country ... horrible sand.. never watered.. a billion seedlings.. i have been killing plants for 5 years.. and have never let another bloom.. and i still have seed coming up all over the garden .. whats that all about ...

Seed

New seedlings look like bluish hairy grass. If you want seed, the small light-green seed capsule, surrounded by three green bracts is mature 2-3 weeks after flowering. A few days prior to splitting, the capsule becomes dry and papery. Collecting seeds is easiest by tying a small bag around the unsplit capsule. I would sow them immediately, the same way mother nature does. They need cold stratification to germinate (over the winter outside). The seeds are very tiny.When we started restoration, the only site we had with spiderwort was the steep road-cut of Pleasant Valley Road. We collected seed there and threw it up the bank, to get it spread farther out. We also found a railroad that had a huge amount growing in its ballast (spiderwort seems to grow well even on sterile railroad ballast). We dried the seed we collected there and saved it for fall planting in our seed mixes. Gradually we were able to spread spiderwort across the Conservancy. Now we have it virtually everywhere. Even though it is not a wetland plant, today I even saw a flowering stalk in our sedge meadow.

For hybrid selections of things like Daylilies (Hemerocallis) or Hosta, just be aware that the resulting seedlings are not likely to resemble the parent plant. Seed saved from a ‘Stella de Oro’ Daylily, for instance, will probably not produce the same constant-flowering, dwarf plant with golden-yellow flowers. Instead, a range of shades will result and most will not inherit the repeat flowering gene, which is a recessive trait. Plants that result might well be garden-worthy and attractive, so if you’re curious to see what might happen, go ahead and try it!The usual trick is to place the seed with some moist, sterilized commercial seeding mix inside a plastic bag, then storing it in a refrigerator for a period of time to break down the natural chemical germination inhibitors within the seed. A typical period of time is about three to four months. Then the seed is sowed as usual and started indoors under lights. Another approach is to sow the seed in late fall in pots, then leave it outside in a protected (but unheated) coldframe for the winter. (Source: www.perennials.com)

 

 

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