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Cedar Sedgeor

Cedar Sedgeor

Cedar Sedge

This is our newest sedge. We have grown it for a few years. It was mixed in with some carex perdentata we had dug up in the wild. I noticed that the blocks of meadow sedge were blooming at different times and after a couple of years we pulled the new sedge out and I identified it. We started growing meadow sedge as a replacement for cedar sedge ( carex plano-stachys) because the difficulties we had growing sufficient number of Cedar sedge. Central Texas has a group of upland sedges that are fairly drought tolerant and meadow sedge was the first species we selected as a replacement for cedar sedge. This is our newest sedge. We have grown it for a few years. It was mixed in with some carex perdentata we had dug up in the wild. I noticed that the blocks of meadow sedge were blooming at different times and after a couple of years we pulled the new sedge out and I identified it. We started growing meadow sedge as a replacement for cedar sedge ( carex plano-stachys) because the difficulties we had growing sufficient number of Cedar sedge. Central Texas has a group of upland sedges that are fairly drought tolerant and meadow sedge was the first species we selected as a replacement for cedar sedge. Meadow sedge is one of the toughest, sun and drought tolerant sedges there is. For many years folks have seen Carex plano-stachys or cedar sedge form colonies in cedar breaks and wanted that look in other dry, inhospitable areas in the landscape. We tried for years to grow Cedar sedge but along with that toughness came a very slow growth rate. It took years for a seedling to get to a size big enough to sell. I searched around and found the next toughest sedge that could be used as a replacement. That plant was Carex perdentata which we called meadow sedge. It grows in dry woodlands of cedar elms, Texas persimon, mesquite and hackberries. It also grows out in the full sun on the open prairies with Cedar Sedge, which is how I found it.

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I am looking for a native low-growing lawn alternative for my northwestern New Jersey home (up to six inches, part sun/shade). I am not allowed to mow the area. Do you have any suggestions? Thank you very much!

We have a new yard around our remodeled home that’s full of that horrible red builder’s fill dirt. What do we do to plant a sedge and groundcover “lawn,” please (there’s some full sun, but it’s mostly under very tall trees). Thanks. (Source:www.bbg.org)

 

 

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