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Capicola:

Capicola:

Capocoll

"Gabagool" redirects here. For the comic book, see Gabagool! (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Could You Survive on the Breadline? (Source: www.sbs.com.au)

Adam Liaw continues to cook, laugh, and explore culture with some of Australia's most beloved in The Cook Up With Adam Liaw. (Source: www.sbs.com.au)

Also known as coppa, capocollo, or gabagool, this fatty, lightly spiced and smoked cold cut is really tasty. (Source: www.thedailymeal.com)

Succulent, superbly seasoned and flavorful, this baked version of Capicola will take your Italian subs, sandwiches, pizza and snacking to a new level! (Source: www.daringgourmet.com)

Capicola (also known as capocollo) and coppa (more on that below) are both Italian charcuterie standards and use the same cut of pork. This specific cut of meat is highly marbled and comes from the neck of the pig (known as the coppa in Italy) and is selected because of it’s a near perfect ratio of 30% fat to 70% lean. This cut is commonly cooked/baked as well as dry-cured to create two different forms of highly popular charcuterie. This recipe is for baked capicola and is inspired by Olympic Provisions’ version. (Source: www.daringgourmet.com)

Capicola: the Italian Dried Meat Tony Soprano Called 'gabagool'

Capicola, or capocollo, is an Italian cold cut traditionally made from the cured muscle of the neck and shoulder of the pig. Owen Franken/Getty Images (Source: recipes.howstuffworks.com)

The names of Italian cured meats are notoriously unstable when it comes to their pronunciation. When there are so many different varieties of meats due to regional styles, it’s easy to see where “gabagoo” came from. At Di Bruno Brothers, we have heard nearly every possible form of these words, from super-sausage to Purzoot (sopressata and prosciutto, respectively). However, there is a method to the madness, and not surprisingly, it all starts in the homeland.

+ collo, neck (from Latin collum); see kÅ­el- in Indo-European roots.]

Now that charcuterie boards are all the rage, it's more important than ever to have a good grasp on what distinguishes the cured meats commonly found on the boards. Capicola, which can also be referred to as coppa or capocollo depending on the specifics, is a regular on the popular snack trays. According to Foodosity, capicola is "a traditional dry-cured, cold cut meat of Italian origin." (Source: www.mashed.com)

Capicola, Capocollo, Coppa, Ham-Capocollo: How Can You Cope?

Capicola, or capocollo, is an Italian cold cut traditionally made from the cured muscle of the neck and shoulder of the pig. Owen Franken/Getty Images (Source: recipes.howstuffworks.com)

Capicola (also known as capocollo) and coppa (more on that below) are both Italian charcuterie standards and use the same cut of pork. This specific cut of meat is highly marbled and comes from the neck of the pig (known as the coppa in Italy) and is selected because of it’s a near perfect ratio of 30% fat to 70% lean. This cut is commonly cooked/baked as well as dry-cured to create two different forms of highly popular charcuterie. This recipe is for baked capicola and is inspired by Olympic Provisions’ version. (Source: www.daringgourmet.com)

Succulent, superbly seasoned and flavorful, this baked version of Capicola will take your Italian subs, sandwiches, pizza and snacking to a new level! (Source: www.daringgourmet.com)

 

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