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Building a pc

Building a pc

Building a pc

So you want to build a PC? In general, building a gaming PC isn’t any harder than building a regular PC, but there are a few things to remember that might help make your experience more streamlined.Organization system. Most components come with additional parts; some are optional, some required for installation in your build. You'll need a way to keep assorted screws, zip ties, cables, manuals, etc. organized by individual components. Without proper organization, these items can easily get mixed up.Zip ties. While these aren’t a must, tying your cables together will make the inside of your PC look much better. If you don't want to buy zip ties, you can tidy things up with twist ties (you'll likely have a surplus from your components' packaging). You can also use Velcro straps — some cases even have them integrated.

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The Central Processing Unit (CPU), also known as the processor, is basically the brain of your PC. This is where the magic happens — when a computer program runs, it sends a list of instructions (which are actually more like tasks) to the CPU. The CPU performs each "instruction" and sends signals to other components to let them know when they need to perform a task. No matter what your experience level is, you should use PCPartPicker. It not only has everything you need to buy, it also lets you build your PC piece by piece right on the website, making sure all your hardware will play nicely together. It even has a few example builds you can tweak to your liking. Regardless of what kind of PC you’re building (home office or gaming), the components you need are going to be the same. You’ll need a motherboard, a central processing unit (CPU), storage, memory, a power supply, a case, and a monitor. The only thing you might not need if you're mostly using this PC for home-office tasks is a GPU (graphics processing unit), but it's necessary for photo or video editing and gaming. That’s a lot of stuff, so what follows is a little breakdown of what each component does, along with some hardware recommendations. If you’ll be playing games on this PC, you’ll need a graphics processing unit (also called a graphics card). This is a specialized processor that’s designed and optimized for handling visual data like the graphics in games. It's also used in video and photo editing and other graphics-intensive tasks. These cards are tough to find in stock (or at a reasonable price) at the moment, so you may have to wait a while.

First, prep yourself a clean workspace. This can be a dining room table, a cleared-off desk—just any surface big enough for your case to lay flat on its side, with ample room around it for the rest of your components. You’ll also need a Phillips-head screwdriver that will fit the screws on your case. When you put these parts together, be sure to discharge any static buildup and work on a nonmetallic surface like a wood table. Or you could just assemble the motherboard on top of the cardboard box it comes in. Flip open your motherboard’s instruction book again and look for a PCIe slot. It’s going to be a horizontal slot with a little plastic latch beside it, near the middle or bottom of your motherboard. That’s where the GPU plugs in. All you need to do is identify the back of your GPU (the side with the HDMI and DisplayPorts), line that up with the back of your case, and push the GPU into the horizontal slot. It should lock into place easily enough, and if it doesn’t, make sure you’re inserting it correctly. You also need to plug the motherboard into your case—the power buttons, audio plugs, and USB ports on the front of your case. There are special headers for each kind of plug scattered around the board, so you'll want to check your manual for the location and function of each grouping of pins. These tiny pins need to be plugged in a certain way, and they're unbelievably minuscule. There's also a hookup for the case's fan—in the case I used there was one header on the motherboard but three fans installed. Then there's the SATA cable for your SSD, which plugs into the motherboard. (Source: www.wired.com)

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Step 1: Carefully remove the motherboard from its antistatic bag and set it on a hard, flat, nonmetal surface such as a wooden desk, or the top of the motherboard box itself. Also, make sure there are no sources of dust or liquid nearby. Even though installing a CPU is an easier task now than it was in previous years, it’s still precarious. There are numerous pins on the CPU and/or motherboard, and bending any one of them could render that component kaput.Step 2: Although the design of Intel and AMD CPUs are a little different, the process for installing them is much the same, no matter which kind of processor and motherboard you have. Intel CPUs have flat metal contacts on the underside, and the pins reside inside the socket, whereas AMD CPUs have pins on the underside of the processor, and contacts in the socket. In either case, do not bend or touch the pins. The square metal bracket holding the CPU in place is the load plate, and it’s raised and lowered using the load lever. When clamped down, the end of the load lever tucks under a hook to keep everything in place. When you unbox your motherboard, the contact array will be covered with a piece of plastic. This plastic will pop out once you open the bracket, so wait to open it until you’re ready to install your processor.

Part Compatibility. When you build a PC, it is essential to make sure all of the parts you purchase are compatible with each other. Everything from the case down to the fans has specific needs that other components need to meet for the final product to work as intended. If you purchase parts without checking compatibility, you could end up with a GPU that does not fit in your case or, even worse, a motherboard that does not support your CPU or RAM. Just be sure to check components for compatibility before buying! The other thing to know is that no two builds are identical. The order we’re going in here is based partly on preference and also based on the needs of the build. For instance, if you have a large aftermarket cooler that blocks the DIMM slots, you may have to go in a different order than we did, or backtrack and pull out a part here or there to to make room for a particularly bulky part or cramped case. More advanced options like liquid cooling and RGB lighting, as well as high-end CPU platforms like Intel's Core X and AMD's Threadripper also aren’t covered in this guide. (Source: www.tomshardware.com)

 

 

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