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bill camp

bill camp

bill camp

Of course, it wasn’t until his big break on a wildly popular show airing at a time when a media company was desperate to find a personality was he able to support himself as a YouTube personality. However, for many, YouTube stardom is just the first rung on the ladder that allows you to finally ditch your old job and do what you love. Unfortunately, this journey is not without its toll.

CAMP

Bill Camp is an American actor. He has played supporting roles in many films such as Lincoln (2012), Compliance (2012), 12 Years a Slave (2013), Love & Mercy (2015), Loving (2016), Molly's Game (2017), Vice (2018), Wildlife (2018), Joker (2019), and News of the World (2021); the HBO miniseries The Night Of in 2016 and The Outsider in 2020; and the Netflix miniseries The Queen's Gambit in 2020. He had a recurring role in the HBO drama series The Leftovers from 2015 to 2017 and the Hulu space drama series The First in 2018. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Camp has appeared in many television series and received a Primetime Emmy Award nomination for his role in the miniseries The Night Of (2016). He was nominated for a Tony Award for his role in the 2016 Broadway revival of the play The Crucible. (Source: en.wikipedia.org Camp was raised in Massachusetts, and is the son of Patricia L., a librarian, and Peter B. Camp, who was an assistant headmaster at the Groton School. (Source:en.wikipedia.org))

Among his works on Broadway are Heartbreak House (2006), Death of a Salesman (2012) and The Crucible (2016). In 2006, Camp joined Philip Bosco and Lily Rabe in the Broadway revival of Heartbreak House at the Roundabout Theatre Company's American Airlines Theatre. In 2012, Camp joined Philip Seymour Hoffman and Andrew Garfield in Mike Nichols' Broadway revival of Death of a Salesman at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre. The show ran from March 15, 2012 through June 2, 2012 and earned rave reviews, and won the Tony Award for Best Revival of a Play. In 2016, he starred in the Broadway revival of The Crucible alongside Saoirse Ronan, Ben Whishaw, Ciaran Hinds and Sophie Okenedo at the Walter Kerr Theatre. He received a Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Play nomination for The Crucible. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Camp has starred in a wide variety of films such as Lincoln (2012), 12 Years a Slave (2013), Love and Mercy (2015), Loving (2016), Molly's Game (2017), Woman Walks Ahead (2017), Vice (2018), Wildlife (2018), Dark Waters (2019), Joker (2019), and The Kitchen (2019). (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

In 2011, he appeared in the second season of the HBO TV series Boardwalk Empire as the hunter Glenmore. Camp has also appeared in Law & Order, The Good Wife, The Leftovers and The Night Of, receiving a Primetime Emmy Award nomination for The Night Of. In 2018, he played FBI agent Bob Chesney, in the critically acclaimed and Emmy-nominated miniseries The Looming Tower. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

www.mensjournal.com)Over the last decade, you’d be hard-pressed to find anyone in Hollywood who’s been on as strong a run as actor Bill Camp. The longtime New York theater actor has popped up on screens big and small, shining in key supporting roles for all types of projects, including in Oscar-winning films (Lincoln, Birdman, 12 Years a Slave), prestige television shows (The Night Of, Boardwalk Empire, The Leftovers, Manhattan), big-budget thrillers (Jason Bourne, Black Mass, Red Sparrow), and critically-acclaimed dramas (Hostiles, Molly’s Game, Wildlife, Loving). (Source:

Camp’s recent triumph has been his role as veteran FBI agent Robert Chesney on Hulu’s The Looming Tower, the 10-episode series based on Lawrence Wright’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book that traces the rise of terrorism and the rivalry between government agencies in the lead-up to September 11. Camp’s performance has earned strong reviews and has been compared to the work he did on another prestige TV drama: HBO’s The Night Of, which won numerous awards and garnered Camp his first-ever Emmy nomination. (Source: www.mensjournal.com)

Camp’s recent triumph has been his role as veteran FBI agent Robert Chesney on Hulu’s The Looming Tower, the 10-episode series based on Lawrence Wright’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book that traces the rise of terrorism and the rivalry between government agencies in the lead-up to September 11. Camp’s performance has earned strong reviews and has been compared to the work he did on another prestige TV drama: HBO’s The Night Of, which won numerous awards and garnered Camp his first-ever Emmy nomination. (Source: www.mensjournal.com With Camp on such a long and successful run, you might be surprised to know that Camp almost left acting altogether in the early aughts. After winning an Obie Award for his role in Tony Kushner’s Homebody/Kabul, he moved to California with his now-wife, actress Elizabeth Marvel (Homeland, House of Cards). While she was shooting the TV series The District, Camp worked a number of jobs, including as a restaurant cook, landscaper, waiter, and at a friend’s auto garage, among others. (Source:www.mensjournal.com))

“I was so caught up in being an actor,” Camp said. “I think that self-centeredness was starting to eat me alive, and I lost myself as just a person in the world. It’s like what happens when you identify yourself as your profession or vocation, but it was my job, that’s all it was, and I lost sight of that. I took about three years off, but that time gave me perspective and helped me become a better actor.” (Source: www.mensjournal.com)

And now that Camp is back, he’s working as much as ever. Following The Looming Tower, which has its emotionally-charged finale on Wednesday, April 18, Camp will appear in Native Son, the film adaptation of Richard Wright’s classic novel; The Kitchen, an action/crime thriller based on the DC/Vertigo comic starring Tiffany Haddish and Melissa McCarthy (not a bad duo to join up with); and one more project with an Academy Award-winning writer that he couldn’t discuss—yet. Camp later went on to star in Vice with Christian Bale and Adam McKay, (likely the film he was referring to), HBO’s The Outsider, Dark Waters with Mark Ruffalo, and Joker with Joaquin Phoenix. Not bad for a guy who almost gave up the profession. (Source: www.mensjournal.com)

Men’s Journal caught up with Camp ahead of The Looming Tower finale to discuss reenacting recent history on television, his favorite places to travel, his acting process, why he loves hockey, and whether we’ll get Season 2 of The Night Of. (Source: www.mensjournal.com)

Bill Camp: It really was a privilege to work on this show, because of the historical relevance, and the fact that this all really happened. Lawrence Wright’s book really is an amazing book. My character, Bob Chesney, isn’t a guy in the book, he’s a composite of a few different real-life people. I was able to talk with those people and it was an honor to speak with them. Being able to spend time with those people and learn from them, and then be able to participate in the telling of this history, that was something special. As an actor, to be able to participate in a detailed, precise, intelligent, 10-hour series, looking at this incredibly big story in regards to the layers and creative team behind it, and production design, and everyone working on it was incredible—I hit the jackpot in every way. (Source: www.mensjournal.com)

As a senior at the prestigious Groton School, where his father was a teacher and headmaster, Bill Camp showed signs of knowing his future path when he abandoned hockey to appear in the school's performance of "The Crucible." After attending the University of Vermont, Camp headed to New York and trained at the venerable Julliard School while beginning his life as a stage actor. Known as someone who fearlessly inhabits his roles, Camp's first onscreen credit was a bit part in "Reversal of Fortune" (1990). Camp continuously worked in theater, playing in Off-Broadway performances of "The Seagull" and "Measure for Measure," and occasionally appearing in films like "In & Out" (1997) or in guest roles on series like "Law & Order" (NBC, 1990-2010). After spending over a year away from acting, Camp returned to the stage in Tony Kushner's play "Homebody/Kabul," which earned him an Obie Award in 2002. Camp's profile began to expand on screen, as well, with roles in "Public Enemies" (2009), "Lincoln" (2012), and "12 Years a Slave" (2013), amongst others. He earned his most exposure to date playing Detective Dennis Box, on the acclaimed HBO limited series "The Night Of" (HBO, 2016). The role earned him an Emmy nomination for Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie. It was announced that Camp would have a series regular role on the Hulu limited series "The Looming Tower" about the threat of Al-Qaeda leading up to 9/11. (Source: www.rottentomatoes.com)

The first time Elizabeth Marvel saw Bill Camp, he was a college dropout, and she was a 15-year-old girl making drawings on the floor. It was the mid-’80s, and Beth (he calls her Beth) was a student at Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan. At this point, Bill had left the University of Vermont and been accepted at Juilliard, but before he went back to school, he and some buddies took a road trip out West to live in a tepee in Colorado. Along the way, they dropped in unannounced on an old pal from UVM who happened to be Beth’s teacher. She was struck by these 20-something guys, the way their long hair and camo shorts seemed like the height of cool. He barely noticed her. (Source: www.vulture.com)

The first time Bill Camp saw Elizabeth Marvel was a few years later. He was still at Juilliard, doing a work-study gig as an audition monitor, and she was one of the young actors hoping to be accepted. The place was crackling with nervous energy, but none of it was coming from Beth. She was sitting in the corner, smoking, without a care in the world. Bill was amazed by this self-assured girl in jeans, Wallabees, and an oxford shirt that was too big for her. He lit her cigarette and wanted to say something charming, but he got nervous and couldn’t find the words. (Source: www.vulture.com)

We’ve been watching Camp and Marvel for years; they’ve been watching each other for decades. As the young lovers settled into middle age, they became two of the most sought-after performers of their generation. They are character actors, utility players who shine in roles no matter the size. This has made them extraordinarily prolific, particularly in recent years. Since 2011, Camp has appeared in 31 movies and 15 television shows; Marvel has been in 21 films and 14 shows. She is blunt about their mid-career renaissance. “We’re really fucking lucky. We got older as streaming platforms hit, and what they churn out is content,” she says. “They need people to carry the water, and we are water carriers. No muss, no fuss.” (Source: www.vulture.com Both are prized for their versatility. Marvel often plays women with a core of cold steel: the president on Homeland, a candidate on House of Cards. She treasures the occasions when she gets to turn herself inside out. As the deadpan sister in The Meyerowitz Stories, she revealed the self-possession in a character viewers might otherwise have written off as a bit of a drip. In Hulu’s Helstrom, she played a mother inhabited by a demon, pouring pure bile into every syllable. Camp is a director’s Swiss Army knife. He excels at playing weary Everymen, as in his breakout turn as a detective on The Night Of, but catch him playing blue bloods, as in Rebecca Hall’s upcoming Passing, and notice how he can smooth himself out like a fine Scotch. Yet when ham is on the menu, he can go as big as anyone. In Dark Waters, he’s a gruff cattle farmer with a voice like apple-cider vinegar and eyebrows that bring to mind an Appalachian Leonid Brezhnev. (Source:www.vulture.com))

Both are prized for their versatility. Marvel often plays women with a core of cold steel: the president on Homeland, a candidate on House of Cards. She treasures the occasions when she gets to turn herself inside out. As the deadpan sister in The Meyerowitz Stories, she revealed the self-possession in a character viewers might otherwise have written off as a bit of a drip. In Hulu’s Helstrom, she played a mother inhabited by a demon, pouring pure bile into every syllable. Camp is a director’s Swiss Army knife. He excels at playing weary Everymen, as in his breakout turn as a detective on The Night Of, but catch him playing blue bloods, as in Rebecca Hall’s upcoming Passing, and notice how he can smooth himself out like a fine Scotch. Yet when ham is on the menu, he can go as big as anyone. In Dark Waters, he’s a gruff cattle farmer with a voice like apple-cider vinegar and eyebrows that bring to mind an Appalachian Leonid Brezhnev. (Source: www.vulture.com www.vulture.com))The randomness of the business has created fun symmetries for the couple: When Marvel was the president on Homeland, Camp was Gerald Ford in Vice. (They sent selfies back and forth from their respective Oval Offices.) And when Marvel was playing a devil on Helstrom, Camp was playing one on Hulu’s Monsterland. His creepy demon voice was achieved in post; he’s amazed Marvel was able to pull off hers all on her own. (Source:

The voice Camp uses in his most famous projects isn’t the one he uses in casual conversation. His real voice is more laid-back, as if Captain Ahab had taken up surfing. Marvel too is crunchier than the power-suited titans she plays. Today, she’s sporting a Marty Feldman hoodie, a sleeve rolled up to reveal the swordfish tattoo on her forearm. (“They dive the deepest.”) Neither is on social media, and the pair are only vaguely aware that there are people on the internet stanning them. Camp shows off a tiny scar on his forehead from a bike accident when he was 11. He was tickled when someone sent him a piece of fan art from Eastern Europe. It was a painting of Mr. Shaibel, the taciturn chess mentor he plays in The Queen’s Gambit, and there on the forehead was the scar. Proof that there are no small roles: A one-inch part of him had been seen 4,000 miles away. (Source: www.vulture.com)

In a sense, to be a famous character actor is to be a theater actor who wants to raise a child in New York. After Juilliard, Camp and Marvel spent the ’90s cutting their teeth on the city’s stage scene. It was a grind—doing one play while rehearsing another, saying yes to anything, even if it paid only $200 a week. “So many actors in their 20s seem to be waiting for that big break,” Camp says. “For us, it was That ain’t gonna happen.” If you weren’t the kind of actor who was going to get cast in Friends, theater was the only game in town. (Source: www.vulture.com)

Both spent the ‘90s in the theatrical trenches, while dating off-and-on; they joke that the entire decade should be off-the-record. Marvel’s first professional role was playing Isabella in Measure for Measure at the 1992 Stratford Shakespeare Fest. (As a young American who’d been brought in by the show’s director, she was not the most popular with the Canadian actresses: “They didn’t like me at all.”) From there, she had a good run of the Bard’s ingénues. Meanwhile, Camp took on dissolute-young-man parts. On two different occasions directors bleached his hair blonde, leading Ben Brantley to twice compare him to Billy Idol. Eventually, the end of the decade saw them become close collaborators with creative minds like Tony Kushner and Ivo van Hove. “We were apprenticing in a way,” Camp said. “We worked with brilliant directors, on these master texts, and that penetrated us and lit the fuse.” (Source: www.vulture.com)

Sometimes the fuse burned out. In his late 30s, Camp was fresh off an acclaimed turn as a heroin-addicted NGO worker in Kushner’s Homebody/Kabul; offstage, he was struggling with his identity outside of the work. “It was like, Who the fuck is this guy? This guy is these characters he’s playing,” he said. “I had run out of gas.” In 2002, he quit acting and joined Marvel in California, where she was working on the CBS procedural The District. The gig did not exactly stretch her skills, but it paid well enough to buy an apartment and help fund her friend’s dance company. She learned the lesson Los Angeles teaches every New Yorker: Not everything has to be so hard. “I was so used to doing theater, sort of cannibalizing myself—chewing, and spitting, and going,” she said. “We never had a moment to reflect in New York. It was just forward motion. Then suddenly I was making money and having everything change.” (Source: www.vulture.com)

Bill Camp is an American actor. Camp had a few stage credits before he became a regular in films and television. He eventually became Hollywood's go-to supporting actor in an array of projects ranging from big-budget shows to critically-acclaimed movies to biographical dramas. He is credited for making appearances in four 'Academy Award'-nominated films, '12 Years a Slave,' 'Birdman' ('The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance'), 'Lincoln,' and 'Vice' of which the first two are winners in the best picture category. Camp has impressive TV credentials as well with substantial roles in shows such as 'Boardwalk Empire,' 'The Leftovers,' and 'Manhattan.' While Camp was flourishing as a film and TV actor, he quit acting briefly but resumed soon after and had notable stage credits. He earned a 'Tony' nomination for Arthur Miller's 'The Crucible' and an 'Obie Award' for 'Homebody/Kabul.' Throughout his illustrious career, Camp has worked with many award-winning directors such as Steven Spielberg, Michael Mann, Stephen Frears, Scott Cooper, Alejandro G. Iñárritu, and Adam McKay. (Source: www.thefamouspeople.com)

Camp began his acting career through theatre and eventually turned towards film and television. He made his film debut playing 'Bill' in the 1990 adaptation of law professor Alan Dershowitz’s book 'Reversal of Fortune: Inside the von Bülow Case.' That year, Camp made his TV appearance in the episode 'Hamlet' of the anthology 'Great Performances.' (Source: www.thefamouspeople.com He also performed in the Broadway 'Jackie,' which ran from November 1997 to March 1998. Camp went on a break from acting in 2002 and took up several odd jobs. Camp had moved to California with his wife, who is also an actor, was then shooting for the series 'The District' while he worked as a restaurant cook, landscaper, waiter, and at a friend’s auto garage, among others. (Source:www.thefamouspeople.com))

Camp resumed two years later with the 'New York Theatre Workshop' production 'Homebody/Kabul.' In that Tony Kushner's three-act play, Camp’s performance as the British government employed expatriate named 'Quango Twistleton' earned him an 'Obie Award' ('Off-Broadway Theater Awards'). (Source: www.thefamouspeople.com Camp portrayed Italian-born American gangster in Chicago, Frank Nitti, who was One of gangster Al Capone's top henchmen in the 2009 biographical crime drama 'Public Enemies.' He next played Ann Dowd’s (as Sandra) fiancée 'Van' in the 2012 thriller 'Compliance.' (Source:www.thefamouspeople.com))

 

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