FutureStarr

Benjamin Vogtor

Benjamin Vogtor

Benjamin Vogt

Monarch Gardens is Benjamin Vogt. His 5,000' home garden on a 1/4 acre lot has been featured in Fine Gardening, Garden Design, The American Gardener, Nebraska Life, the Omaha World Herald, and the Lincoln Journal Star. For five years (2012-2017) Benjamin wrote an award-winning garden column for Houzz (over 3 million reads with 200 articles) and has contributed to books such as Lawn Gone! and Pollinator Friendly Gardening. You'll find his freelance photography and writing in several publications, including The Xerces Society's Gardening for Butterflies (Timber Press), as well as Orion Magazine, Northern Gardener, APLD's The Designer, Fix, Fine Gardening, and many others. He has been interviewed for dozens of podcasts, articles, and books while speaking nationally on environmental activism and sustainable urban design for wildlife.

Vogt

Benjamin Vogt is the author of three books ---- A New Garden Ethic: Cultivating Defiant Compassion for an Uncertain Future, Prairie Up: An Introduction to Natural Garden Design, and Afterimage: Poems. He owns Monarch Gardens LLC, a prairie-inspired garden design firm that works with clients in Nebraska and throughout the Midwest. His landscapes have been featured in Fine Gardening, Garden Design, The American Gardener, Midwest Living, Nebraska Life, the Omaha World Herald, and the Lincoln Journal Star. For over 5 years Benjamin wrote an award-winning garden column for Houzz (nearly 3 million readers) and has contributed words and photographs to several books including: Lawn Gone!, Pollinator Friendly Gardening, and Gardening for Butterflies (The Xerces Society).

He is a sought after speaker for his humor and lyrical passion, presenting at national conferences, botanic gardens, and symposiums. Benjamin Vogt addresses why we need a new garden ethic, and why we urgently need wildness in our daily lives—lives sequestered in buildings surrounded by monocultures of lawn and concrete that significantly harm our physical and mental health. He examines the psychological issues around climate change and mass extinction as a way to understand how we are short-circuiting our response to global crises, especially by not growing native plants in our gardens. Simply put, environmentalism is not political; it's social justice for all species marginalized today and for those facing extinction tomorrow. By thinking deeply and honestly about our built landscapes, we can create a compassionate activism that connects us more profoundly to nature and to one another. (Source: www.amazon.com)

 

 

Related Articles