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Atlantic city the band

Atlantic city the band

Atlantic city the band

Atlantic city is a band that has been able to find a way to infuse a banjo-heavy three-piece into stoner-rock, country, and just about anything else they plan on releasing in the future. Hit play on “Elevator” and you’ll be sure to see just how unique a group they are.

Jericho

It was a grisly death, and it caused the group to splinter off for a few years. They started touring heavily again in the late 1980s, and in 1993, they decided to record their first album since Island in 1977. They centered Jericho around covers of songs by Bob Dylan, Muddy Waters, Willie Dixon and Artie Traum. The clear highlight was Bruce Springsteen‘s “Atlantic City,” sung by Levon Helm. Here’s a live version from 1994. 

Jericho scored positive reviews but it failed to make much of an impact in a marketplace dominated by new releases from Pearl Jam, Nirvana and Whitney Houston. They released another LP in 1998 but broke up for good in 1999 when Rick Danko died after a decades-long battle with drugs. Levon Helm kept “Atlantic City” in his solo repertoire, playing it at countless Midnight Rambles in the final years of his life. (Source: www.rollingstone.com)

The Band covered the song for their 1993 album Jericho. Rolling Stone called it a "clear highlight". After the Band split up, Levon Helm continued to perform "Atlantic City" in his solo performances. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

The Band covered the song for their 1993 album Jericho. Rolling Stone called it a "clear highlight". After the Band split up, Levon Helm continued to perform "Atlantic City" in his solo performances. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

It was a grisly death, and it caused the group to splinter off for a few years. They started touring heavily again in the late 1980s, and in 1993, they decided to record their first album since Island in 1977. They centered Jericho around covers of songs by Bob Dylan, Muddy Waters, Willie Dixon and Artie Traum. The clear highlight was Bruce Springsteen‘s “Atlantic City,” sung by Levon Helm. Here’s a live version from 1994. (Source: www.rollingstone.com)

Jericho scored positive reviews but it failed to make much of an impact in a marketplace dominated by new releases from Pearl Jam, Nirvana and Whitney Houston. They released another LP in 1998 but broke up for good in 1999 when Rick Danko died after a decades-long battle with drugs. Levon Helm kept “Atlantic City” in his solo repertoire, playing it at countless Midnight Rambles in the final years of his life. (Source: www.rollingstone.com)

Track

Springsteen wrote in his Greatest Hits sleeve notes that he recorded the track in his bedroom "for $1,050 (the cost of the four-track Tascam recorder), mixed through an old Gibson guitar unit to a beat box". He provides the vocals, guitar, harmonica, tambourine, organ, and synthesizer for the song.

Springsteen wrote in his Greatest Hits sleeve notes that he recorded the track in his bedroom "for $1,050 (the cost of the four-track Tascam recorder), mixed through an old Gibson guitar unit to a beat box". He provides the vocals, guitar, harmonica, tambourine, organ, and synthesizer for the song. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

The last track on that list was going to be called “Fistful of Dollars,” named after and based on the Leone movie, but as the then-31-year-old songwriter worked and reworked its verses, his focus began to shift to Atlantic City. Musically, it’s the catchiest number on the album, and one of the most recognizable — the same three-note melody repeats throughout, changing only slightly in the choruses and bridge. It shares its sepulchral, lo-fi tone with the rest of the songs in Nebraska, however it’s the only one featuring BGVs: Springsteen harmonizes his choruses and provides atmosphere in his verses with melodic rock yells underneath them. Despite that being its only real technical distinction, the song can still be set aside from the rest as the one with the furthest sonic reach. (Source: americansongwriter.com)

While all of the track listings sound expansive — their threadbare instrumentation, made up of guitar, vocals, and glockenspiel, reaching ambitiously into arena-rock purview through Springsteen’s passionate delivery — “Atlantic City” is the only one which doesn’t sound like a stripped-down smaller version of some larger idea. Perhaps its hook overpowers the album’s instrumental limits (a hit is a hit!), or its aphoristic lines: “everything dies, baby that’s a fact, but maybe everything that dies, someday comes back,” cryptically suggest a larger narrative than its protagonist is telling. He’s a waifish young gambler pulling all the wrong strings and placing all the wrong bets, in particular on any unsavory opportunities to salvage his crashing life and the love of his loyal paramour. (Source: americansongwriter.com)

 

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