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Asclepias Quadrifoliaor

Asclepias Quadrifoliaor

Asclepias Quadrifolia

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Asclepias quadrifolia (Fourleaf Milkweed) is an upright, single-stemmed perennial clad with a distinctive whorl of four symmetrical, egg-shaped leaves, 2-6 in. long (5-15 cm), along the stem. From late spring to midsummer, tiny, fragrant, white to pinkish flowers open from rosy buds. They are held in charming, up-facing pendant umbels atop the plant's stem. The blossoms are a great nectar source for butterflies and pollinators. They give way to smooth, narrow seed pods in the fall that are valued in dried flower arrangements. Native to the eastern United States and Canada, this perennial wildflower adds interest in the woodland garden, cottage garden or rock garden.

Asclepias

Fourleaf, or whorled milkweed, is a slender, single-stemmed perennial with round clusters of usually pink flowers. Flowers are technically in loose umbels, either upright or drooping, from 1 to 3 umbels per plant, light pink or cream-colored, nicely fragrant. Blooms May–July. Leaves opposite or whorled. There are 3 or 4 sets of leaves, of which 1 or 2 of the upper sets has 4 leaves in a whorl, the other sets with 2 leaves. The leaves are broadly lanceolate, pointed at both ends. Sap is milky white. Asclepias quadrifolia (Fourleaf Milkweed) is an upright, single-stemmed perennial clad with a distinctive whorl of four symmetrical, egg-shaped leaves, 2-6 in. long (5-15 cm), along the stem. From late spring to midsummer, tiny, fragrant, white to pinkish flowers open from rosy buds. They are held in charming, up-facing pendant umbels atop the plant's stem. The blossoms are a great nectar source for butterflies and pollinators. They give way to smooth, narrow seed pods in the fall that are valued in dried flower arrangements. Native to the eastern United States and Canada, this perennial wildflower adds interest in the woodland garden, cottage garden or rock garden.

The entire former milkweed family (Asclepiadaceae) has recently been rolled into the dogbane family (Apocynaceae). For many years, botanists have known the two families were closely related. The milkweed group, with its distinct floral structures, is still considered a unique subfamily or tribe of the dogbane family. As you consult various sources, you can expect to see milkweeds grouped in either family. A very simple way of thinking about the green world is to divide the vascular plants into two groups: woody and nonwoody (or herbaceous). But this is an artificial division; many plant families include some species that are woody and some that are not. The diversity of nonwoody vascular plants is staggering! Think of all the ferns, grasses, sedges, lilies, peas, sunflowers, nightshades, milkweeds, mustards, mints, and mallows — weeds and wildflowers — and many more! (Source: mdc.mo.gov)

 

 

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