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Andersonglossum Virginianumor

Andersonglossum Virginianumor

Andersonglossum Virginianum

Classical music is often a topic of great debate, discussions, and political battles. In this highly politicized world it is difficult to come to any consensus. This difficulty can lead to a rising generation becoming apathetic to classical music and a more generalized sense that the art is without interest, with the exception of some classical music performed in places like Starbucks.Andersonglossum virginianum has adapted a unique ability to survive fire because, as mentioned above, it requires fire to eliminate competition and increase light to help nurture itself. This also has not been proven by research but history suggests that there may be a possibility that this species is adapted to occasional fires. This can be said due to the frequent fires the forest has gone through in which this species is found.

Andersonglossum

Andersonglossum virginianum is an erect, unbranched perennial with rough fine hair on its leaves and stem. Their leaves are simple, entire, and have an alternate pattern. The leaves are denser at the lower end of the stem and they get smaller going up the stem. It has two to six racemes. The flowers have five deep lobes that are connected to a superior ovary which in turn is connected to the style. The flowers have rounded, light blue corollas that overlap each other. The corollas alternate with stamen with anthers. Andersonglossum virginianum is an erect, unbranched perennial with rough fine hair on its leaves and stem. Their leaves are simple, entire, and have an alternate pattern. The leaves are denser at the lower end of the stem and they get smaller going up the stem. It has two to six racemes. The flowers have five deep lobes that are connected to a superior ovary which in turn is connected to the style. The flowers have rounded, light blue corollas that overlap each other. The corollas alternate with stamen with anthers. Overall the flower resemble forget-me-not (It is in the same family (Boraginacaea), as is comfrey).

In late May 2021, Suzanne Cadwell, all-around naturalist and avid contributor to iNaturalist, got a message from Dr. John Gaskin of the United States Department of Agriculture in Sidney, Montana. “I notice that you are the top observer of Andersonglossum virginianum on iNaturalist. Nice job! Up here in Montana and Idaho we are working on biological control of a weedy invasive from Europe, hounds-tongue (Cynoglossum officinale), which is a close relative of A. virginianum. We are in need of some rootstock of A.v., but obviously it grows no closer to us than Illinois (too far). We have tried to raise it from seed but no luck. We need to grow it and make sure the biocontrol insect does not bother this nice native Andersonglossum in any way. So, I was wondering (if you live close to any of your observations) if we might impose upon you for digging up four plants and sending the root stock to us. I have an account to pay overnight shipping and can give further instructions or details of the research. Thank you for even considering this.” (Source: ncbg.unc.edu)

 

 

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