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American hazelnut tree

American hazelnut tree

American hazelnut tree

The American Filbert is a multi-stemmed shrub with a rounded top and an open, often wide-spreading base. Because of its size, it is adapts well to naturalizing and other nonformal areas. It bears annual, abundant crops of small, sweet tasting nuts. It will bear in 2-3 years after planting. The nuts are easy to crack and drop free of the husk when mature. (Plant multiple trees with the same flowering time to ensure pollination) (zone 4-9)

American

The American Filbert is a multi-stemmed shrub with a rounded top and an open, often wide-spreading base. Because of its size, it is adapts well to naturalizing and other nonformal areas. It bears annual, abundant crops of small, sweet tasting nuts. It will bear in 2-3 years after planting. The nuts are easy to crack and drop free of the husk when mature. (Plant multiple trees with the same flowering time to ensure pollination) (zone 4-9)Notes: American hazelnut is a small tree with an edible nut. It is a medium to fast growing species, that suckers moderately, eventually producing a multi-stemmed, clump appearance. American Hazelnut grows as a strong multi-stemmed shrub, with their edible nuts maturing in September-October. It is planted by wildlife enthusiasts to attract and keep game in an area. The nuts produced by American hazelnut are a mast of squirrels, deer, turkey, woodpeckers, pheasants and other animals. The male catkins are a food staple of ruffed grouse throughout the winter.

American Hazelnut, Corylus americana, is an easy-to-grow native shrub that produces edible nuts in late summer. Able to thrive in a wide range of conditions, this native shrub is a good choice for hedgerow or windbreak. It can be pruned at any time of year and its deep green leaves turn copper and yellow …This interesting shrub has sweet edible nuts that can be eaten raw or used in cooking. They are high in protein and very nutritious. American Hazelnut is relatively easy to identify during the summer and fall because its nuts are surrounded by distinctive bracts with wide ragged margins. Another native shrub, Corylus cornuta (Beaked Hazelnut) is rare in Illinois; it has been found only in Jo Daviess county at the NW corner of the state. Beaked Hazelnut has less hairy leaf undersides, petioles, and twigs than American Hazelnut. The protective bracts of its nuts join together to form a long narrow beak that is very different from the bracts of American Hazelnut. Beaked Hazelnut is a boreal species that is more common in areas that lie to the north and northeast of Illinois. (Source: www.illinoiswildflowers.info)

 

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