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American hazelnut size

American hazelnut size

American hazelnut size

American Hazelnut, Corylus americana, is an easy-to-grow native shrub that produces edible nuts in late summer. Able to thrive in a wide range of conditions, this native shrub is a good choice for hedgerow or windbreak. It can be pruned at any time of year and its deep green leaves turn copper and yellow …

Hazelnut

The native American Hazelnut has been found in all counties of Illinois (see Distribution Map); it is occasional to locally common throughout the state. However, populations of this shrub have declined somewhat because of habitat destruction. Habitats include rocky upland forests, moist to dry-mesic woodlands, sandy Oak woodlands, wooded slopes, woodland borders, typical.Hazelnut is a native deciduous shrub in the Betulaceae family that may grow 9 to 12 feet tall. It can be found naturally in rocky woodlands, forests, and thickets. The leaves are alternate with a double-toothed margin and hairy stem. The bark is gray-brown and smooth with a criss-cross netted pattern. Light brown, male flowers and red, female stigma and styles mature in early spring. The shrub produces a 1/2-inch brown nut that is enclosed in a hairy, leaf-like husk with ragged edges. Nuts are edible at maturity in the fall.

Hazelnut has been grown as an ornamental since 1798. In addition to its edible nuts and attractive leaves, it can produce good fall color. It’s a native shrub that tolerates clay soils, nearness to black walnut, attracts birds, and is showy much of the year. It makes a good hedge or screen in informal plantings, where it can spread into a thicket. If you want to grow it as a single plant, make sure to remove the suckers that arise near the base.Corylus americana is a shrub with simple, alternate, toothed leaves and a very bushy form. The male flowers are arranged in elongate aments and the female flowers are in small groups within buds that are similar to the leaf-bearing buds. The fruit is a nut that develops between a pair of tough and bristly bracts. See also our other species of hazelnut in Wisconsin, Corylus cornuta, the beaked hazelnut. (Source: www.uwgb.edu)

 

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