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Agastache plant

Agastache plant

Agastache plant

Despite its name, anise hyssop is only distantly related to hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) and mint (Mentha spp.). While they’re all in the same Lamiaceae family, Hyssop is a small genus of herbaceous or semi-woody plants native to the Mediterranean and central Asia, while Mentha is a genus of fragrant herbs. Lamiaceae is often referred to as the ‘mint family’.

Plant

Prepare the soil as you would for planting any perennial, and add a generous helping of well-rotted manure or compost, to improve nutrient and humus levels in the soil. On heavier soils, add a good layer of horticultural grit to the base of the planting hole, to aid drainage. Then plant agastache at the same depth it was in the pot you bought or grew it in. Firm the soil around the rootball and water well.Prepare the soil as you would for planting any perennial, and add a generous helping of well-rotted manure or compost, to improve nutrient and humus levels in the soil. On heavier soils, add a good layer of horticultural grit to the base of the planting hole, to aid drainage. Then plant agastache at the same depth it was in the pot you bought or grew it in. Firm the soil around the rootball and waer well.

While tricky to pronounce ("ah-GAH-stuh-kee"), this prolific herbaceous perennial with over 22 different species is well-loved for its ability to lure pollinators. Among these species are plants with more familiar, descriptive names: anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum), licorice mint (Agastache rupestris), and hummingbird mint (Agastache cana). The name "agastache" is derived from the Greek and essentially means a very large ear of grain, referring to the abundant flower spikes. In addition to being a beneficial garden plant, agastache is also beautiful, available in a wide range of vivid colors from light pink to deep purple, blue, red, orange, and white. It has a minty, herby fragrance and can be dried to make a delicious herbal tea.Dividing & Transplanting: Agastache is grown as an annual in cooler climates and a perennial in warmer climates. There's no need for dividing plants in cooler climates. Where Agastache is a perennial it will usually brown and dieback to the ground in winter. For perennials, every 3 to 5 years, dig and divide the plant in spring to rejuvenate it, taking one-foot diameter sections to replant in a location with similar growing conditions. (Source: www.americanmeadows.com)

 

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