FutureStarr

African waterleaf

African waterleaf

African waterleaf

when it is raining or snowing. While blooming, its appearance will change, becoming larger and speckled with aqua leaves. A blooming Waterleaf will also emit little globes of water. Note that it does not need to be raining or snowing directly on the plant in order for it to bloom: rain or snow simply needs to occur.

Waterleaf

waterleaf, any of about eight species of herbaceous plants constituting a genus (Hydrophyllum) in the borage family (Boraginaceae) and native to damp woodlands of North America. Light-greenish mottling on the leaves, suggesting watermarks on paper, gives the genus its name. Notable members of the genus are the 75-cm- (2.5-foot-) tall.Waterleaf has no direct food value for wildlife. Submerged portions of all aquatic plants provide habitats for many micro and macro invertebrates. These invertebrates in turn are used as food by fish and other wildlife species (e.g. amphibians, reptiles, ducks, etc.). After aquatic plants die, their decomposition by bacteria and fungi provides food (called “detritus”) for many aquatic invertebrates.

Waterleaf is high in vitamins A and C as well as iron and calcium, but this green should be eaten in moderation. It has a fairly high amount of calcium oxalate in a soluble form, which could be a problem for people with kidney disorders, gout, and rheumatoid arthritis. It also contains hydrocyanic acid, but that is destroyed by cooking. Caution should be used in feeding Water Leaf to infants as it has substantial amounts of nitrates and nitrites to which they are sensitive.A good naturalizing plant for moist wooded areas, Waterleaf prefers shady to partly shady sites and loamy soils rich in organic matter. The flowers appear in late-spring, begin to senesce in early summer, and plants will die-back late in the summer if the soil dries out. Combine it with White Baneberry, Blue Cohosh, Wild Geranium, Solomon’s Plume, or ferns to fill-in later in the season. (Source: www.prairienursery.com

 

 

Related Articles