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Adopt a puppy

Adopt a puppy

Adopt a puppy

Your puppy’s first night (or two, or three, or four) will very likely be memorable. That’s a nice way of saying, expect the worst. PHS/SPCA advises having your new dog sleep in your bedroom, but not in your bed. (Or at least not until you know your dog better and can be sure sleeping on your bed will not exacerbate an overly confident or dominant dog’s desire to be the alpha dog in his new pack.) Expect your new puppy to wake you several times during the first night with his cries, barks or even howls. Quite simply, he’s stressed out, frightened, insecure. He may also have to urinate or eliminate. Take care of his needs, be comforting and caring. Above all, do not yell or be impatient; this will only increase your puppy’s stress. All should calm down soon enough. Is your new dog a perfect student? Find out at PHS/SPCA’s Puppy Preschool, an eight-week class designed especially for dogs 2-4 months old. For puppies age 4-6 months, we offer Puppy Kindergarten. The puppies learn basic obedience exercises; but the primary purpose of the class is to give puppy owners tools for raising well-socialized canine companions who are housetrained who no longer nip, and who regard the humans in the family with respect. Puppy classes are also a great forum for exchanging ideas and experience with other puppy parents.

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We are sorry to inform you that all dog and cat adoptions are closed until at least December 26, at the KHS Main Campus at 241 Steedly Drive, as our staff concentrates on assisting Kentucky animal shelters in urgent need of help after the devastating tornadoes. We are working to get as many unowned shelter pets out of Kentucky as possible and into shelters that have space across the country. All the animals we take in were in Kentucky shelters before the storm and were not lost after the storm. The goal is to make space in rural shelters for incoming stray, injured and owner-surrendered animals. While the adoption center on Steedly Drive is closed, dog and cat adoptions remain open at the East Campus at 1000 Lyndon Lane, and cat adoptions are open at Purrfect Day Cafe, 1741 Bardstown Road. Thank you for understanding! The single most important thing to do for your new puppy is to bond with him. Creating and deepening this emotional tie with your dog will make obedience training easier, behavior problems fewer and less intense, and will enhance your enjoyment of your dog. Give your dog a friendly name and use it frequently; feed your puppy with affection; walk your dog with pleasure and excitement; comb and brush him gently; exercise him in a playful manner.

Your puppy’s first night (or two, or three, or four) will very likely be memorable. That’s a nice way of saying, expect the worst. PHS/SPCA advises having your new dog sleep in your bedroom, but not in your bed. (Or at least not until you know your dog better and can be sure sleeping on your bed will not exacerbate an overly confident or dominant dog’s desire to be the alpha dog in his new pack.) Expect your new puppy to wake you several times during the first night with his cries, barks or even howls. Quite simply, he’s stressed out, frightened, insecure. He may also have to urinate or eliminate. Take care of his needs, be comforting and caring. Above all, do not yell or be impatient; this will only increase your puppy’s stress. All should calm down soon enough. We are against purchasing a puppy from a pet store, as many sell puppies who were born and raised in “puppy mills,” inhumane breeding factories whose dogs often develop physical and/or temperamental problems. Find out which breeds, or mixes, fit your lifestyle. How big will he grow? What are his exercise needs? Take time to get to know several puppies before selecting the newest member of your family. In The Chosen Puppy, Carol Lea Benjamin offers some guidelines and “tests” for picking the puppy who is best for you. (Source: phs-spca.org)

 

 

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