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A sexual meaning

A sexual meaning

A sexual meaning

A notable organization for the asexuality community is the website AVEN, the Asexuality Visibility and Education Network, launched in 2001, and since then has been representing and advocating for asexual individuals. Into the 2000s, asexual persons have joined LGBTQ activism for the fair and equal treatment of all sexual orientations, including asexuality. Other unique words and phrases used in the asexual community to elaborate identities and relationships also exist. One term coined by individuals in the asexual community is friend-focused, which refers to highly valued, non-romantic relationships. Other terms include squishes and zucchinis, which are non-romantic crushes and queer-platonic relationships, respectively. Some asexuals use ace playing card suits as identities of their romantic orientation, such as the ace of spades for aromanticism and the ace of hearts for non-aromanticism. There are asexual-identified individuals who report that they feel sexual attraction but not the inclination to act on it because they have no true desire or need to engage in sexual or non-sexual activity (cuddling, hand-holding, etc.), while other asexuals engage in cuddling or other non-sexual physical activity.

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Lancaster: There are a number of different kinds of attraction: sexual attraction, romantic attraction, but also platonic attraction, aesthetic attraction, sensual attraction. Sexual attraction is basically the super intense urge to have sex with another person. And romantic attraction is basically limerence, which is kind of the crush, but the crush with an intense need for the person to love you back. For a lot of people, sex and love are intertwined in that sense. For some people, they experience sexual attraction, but they don't experience that romantic attraction. And for others, they experience that romantic desire, but it's not connected with sex. Esperanza: It really depends on the person. There are plenty of asexual people who want to be in relationships and have sex and they enjoy it. But often when they come out to someone as asexual, especially in a relationship, their partner is like, "oh, well you don't want to have sex with me. I don't want to be with you." But some asexuals do enjoy sex. ... There are others who don't ever want to have sex, have zero desire in it. For others, it just kind of depends on the day. The common denominator is just that they don't experience consistent sexual attraction.

In general though, being asexual is about how someone experiences sexual desire and/or attraction, and it doesn't necessarily mean anything in particular about a person's sexual behavior. Some asexual people feel neutral about engaging in sexual activity, while others are actively put off by the idea of it. Some asexual people do have sex and even enjoy it; they simply don't experience desire for it.Asexuality exists on a spectrum that ranges from "no sexual interest or feelings at all" to "maybe sex under very specific circumstances," explains Good Vibrations staff sexologist Carol Queen, Ph.D. Some people may feel more comfortable saying that they're on the asexual spectrum than classifying themselves as asexual since it leaves wiggle room for different gradations of the identity. Just like it's not really clear what makes someone heterosexual, we don't know what makes someone asexual, says Darnell. Some people feel they were always that way, while others may become asexual because they feel that societal conventions around how people have sex don't work for them, says Queen. (Source: www.mindbodygreen.com)

PEOPLE

Again, it completely depends on the person, but some asexual people do have sex for many different reasons and AVEN says that some do enjoy it. They might choose to engage in sexual activities for the pleasure of their partner, to conceive a child, or simply because they want to know what it's like. Some asexual people even have continuous sex in a committed relationship, "because of the other elements of bonding and physical stimulation that please them," says AVEN.Absolutely! There is nothing asexuality that would prevent you from having a crush on someone or being in love. The difference is, the attraction isn't sexual. Instead, it has to do with the person's personality or maybe your compatibility. It is normal for an asexual person to be romantic, and they may define themselves as heteroromantic or homoromantic, depending on who they find themselves attracted to. Of course, some people find themselves to be aromantic, meaning they don't have romantic desires at all.

Finding "the one" would not end up being the panacea she hoped for in her youth. What Esperanza eventually discovered was she identified as asexual, a sexual orientation in which a person experiences little to no sexual attraction to other people. Asexuality exists on a spectrum, and while some people who identify as asexual don't desire sex, many do. Identifying as asexual doesn't mean you don't have a sex drive, don't have a high libido or don't fall in love. Lancaster: There are a number of different kinds of attraction: sexual attraction, romantic attraction, but also platonic attraction, aesthetic attraction, sensual attraction. Sexual attraction is basically the super intense urge to have sex with another person. And romantic attraction is basically limerence, which is kind of the crush, but the crush with an intense need for the person to love you back. For a lot of people, sex and love are intertwined in that sense. For some people, they experience sexual attraction, but they don't experience that romantic attraction. And for others, they experience that romantic desire, but it's not connected with sex. (Source: www.usatoday.com)

 

 

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