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10 Tips On How To Write Less Badly

10 Tips On How To Write Less Badly

10 tips on how to write less badly

Write

Ciroc: | Future Starr

Writing is the key to a vast majority of communication nowadays. Writing is used for personal and professional purposes, though the writing process is a particularly demanding one. It is important to write well to easily communicate your intentions and your thoughts to an audience, whether they be your colleagues or people across the globe. The tips below serve as advice on how to write less badly, so you should take them to heart. If they seem too difficult to follow, consider learning to code.

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Most academics, including administrators, spend much of our time writing. But we aren’t as good at it as we should be. I have never understood why our trade values, but rarely teaches, nonfiction writing. (Source: www.chronicle.com)

Write

Not sure what words you need to replace? Start by imagining you are a character in the story. Which words for that character are simply noise in your writing? Keep in mind that any word can be replaced by a word with a similar meaning. For example: your can be replaced by my and then by your. The point of writing is creating a story. If you are replacing words that do not mean anything, then you have nothing to write.

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Give yourself time - writers wrestle with ideas a long time; you get ideas when you write, you don't just write down ideas. (Source: charlesreid1.com)

Work

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The most important suggestion we can make for improving your writing is to do it. Writing constantly is vital for your skill level, and there is a lot of psychological evidence that says it’s actually easier to write as your vocabulary improves and as you write more consistently. You also need to make writing a habit for your process to improve. After you begin writing, take a break then come back and read what you wrote in your reread.

David M. Schultz is a Professor of Synoptic Meteorology at the Centre for Atmospheric Science, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, and the Centre for Crisis Studies and Mitigation, The University of Manchester. Presently, he is Chief Editor for Monthly Weather Review, the longest-running meteorological journal in the world. In 2014 and 2017, he received the University of Manchester Teaching Excellence Award, the only academic to have twice done so. He has published over 160 peer-reviewed journal articles. (Source: eloquentscience.com)

 

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