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You Know My Name (Look Up The Number) Live YouTube

You Know My Name (Look Up The Number) Live YouTube

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You Know My Name (Look Up The Number) Live YouTube

You Know My Name Look Up The Number  live YouTube

You Know My Name (Look Up the Number) is a song written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon. It was originally released in 1970 on the Let It Be single. The song was recorded using a four-track microphone and was released only in mono, not stereo. It was later included on the "Past Masters" compilation and "Anthology 2" album.

You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)

The Beatles' song "You Know My Name (Look Up the Number)" was written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon and released in 1970 as the B-side to their single Let It Be. It was recorded with four-track microphones and has a saxophone part by Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones.

You Know My Name (Look Up the Number) was first recorded in mono until 1996, when it was extended to stereo. This extended version preserved some parts of the mono single, and omitted others. The result was a difference in the way the song ends: the stereo version has a fade-out talking portion, whereas the mono version does not. The stereo version of the song, with all five sections uncut, has never been officially released, nor has it been available on bootlegs.

In 1967, the Beatles began recording 'You Know My Name' on 17 May 1967. The recording process took fourteen takes, including retakes and rehearsals. The song's best take featured drums, guitars, bass, handclaps, and bongos. The Beatles returned to recording the song on 7 June and recorded five takes totaling 20 minutes. The instrumentation included flute, electric guitar, bass, tambourine, and drums.

You Know My Name (Look Up The Number) lyrics

"You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)" is a song written by the English rock band the Beatles. It was released on the Let It Be single in 1970. The song was recorded over four sessions. It also features a saxophone part by Brian Jones from the Rolling Stones.

Although the song is mostly instrumental, there are some parts of the song that are sung in falsetto. John Lennon intended to release it as a single, but the band decided to use it as a B-side for 'Let It Be.' It was only released in mono until 1996.

You Know My Name (Look Up The Number) music

You Know My Name (Look Up The Number), the 1967 Beatles song, was a classic. It was written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and released as a B-side for the single Let It Be. The song was recorded in four sessions and features a saxophone part by Rolling Stones member Brian Jones.

The song was originally released in mono, but in 1996, the band released an extended stereo mix of it. This version restored several parts of the song that were cut from the mono single. The extended stereo mix also restored the ending, which is slightly different from the mono version. The mono version features a fade-out before the talking portion, while the stereo version lacks this part. No bootlegs exist of the extended stereo mix.

The track was also edited for radio airplay. Initially, the song was rock-oriented, but later became a lounge-sounding track. The band re-released "You Know My Name" on CD on September 9, 2009, and again on November 12, 2012.

The track was originally intended to be released as a single by the Plastic Ono Band. Lennon and Yoko Ono remained in the band, but in late 1969, they separated privately and released a single. The single also included the song "What's the New Mary Jane?"

You Know My Name (Look Up The Number) album

The "You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)" album was originally recorded in mono. The extended stereo mix was later included on the Beatles' Anthology 2 compilation. This extended mix was an eye-opening listen for fans of the song. The song ends with a talking portion that fades out in the mono single, but the extended version does not.

The song "You Know My Name" was written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon and originally released as the B-side of "Let It Be." The single went on to reach the number one spot on the Billboard singles chart, staying at the top for two weeks. However, "You Know My Name" received only minor radio exposure, resulting in its relative obscurity.

"You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)" is more of a medley than a coherent song. In fact, "Look Up The Number" is a composite of five songs strung together. This makes it similar to other Beatles' works that switch styles, and in some ways predates the Abbey Road medley.

The song was written by John Lennon and produced by his former bandmate George Harrison. The song was originally intended to be released as a single by the Plastic Ono Band. The band planned to release "You Know My Name" as a b-side for the single "Let It Be."

You Know My Name (Look Up The Number) video

You Know My Name (Look Up the Number) is a song by the English rock group the Beatles. It was released on their Let It Be single in 1970. The song is notable for incorporating a saxophone part by Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones. In addition to Lennon and McCartney, the song also features George Harrison on vibraphone.

This song was written nearly four years before the Beatles broke up. It was originally a B-side to the song 'Let It Be', which was the band's final UK single. It also contains many famous lyrics from the group, including the infamous "You Know My Name."

The song's lyrics have many interesting riffs and ad-libs. One interesting twist of the song is the introduction to Paul McCartney. Instead of presenting himself as the director of "A Hard Day's Night," he's introduced as Dennis O'Bell.

You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)

You Know My Name Look Up The Number The Beatles

After completing "You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)," The Beatles recorded five experimental takes. These takes were labeled "Instrumental - Unidentified." The Beatles left the studio around 2 am the next day. The following morning, they began their work on "Let It Be," which is known as their most popular song.

Paul McCartney

You Know My Name (Look Up The Number) is one of The Beatles' best-known songs. It was recorded over a two-year period between 1967 and 1969. The title was inspired by a postal advertisement seen by John McCartney. The group recorded five takes of the song, labeling each "Instrumental - Unknown." The group left the studio at two in the morning.

The song's second part was recorded in twelve takes. The group performed on the piano and guitar. George added vibraphone at the end. As a result, the music resembles a cool jazzy backing track with a swinging ride beat. The Beatles' intention to be "a great tea-room orchestra" was further confirmed by this instrumental section.

The song contains references to other musicians, including a reference to Dennis O'Dell, who was an associate producer on the film A Hard Day's Night. The song's lyrics include a reference to the film producer who Lennon had worked with. It also refers to an associate of McCartney's named "Denis O'Bell."

This song was supposed to be released on December 5, 1969. It wasn't released due to Lennon's disapproval. The band didn't want to be listed on the single, and they wanted to avoid a tiff with EMI over distribution. Afterwards, the single was re-issued with the Beatles name. It reached number 21 on the Billboard album chart.

The song starts off with a six-measure introduction. The first verse features Ringo on the drums with the snare only on two beats. John then plays piano chords on the downbeats. The last two verses are in a Sinatra-like swing style.

This song is one of the Beatles' lesser-known songs. It was recorded when the band was breaking up and was originally conceived as a self-indulgent comedy. It was never intended to be a live performance. Paul McCartney once called it his favorite.

While the band is known for their songs, the Beatles' biggest success was their back catalogue. Some of their most popular tracks have b-sides that people may not have even heard. The US single "Let It Be" is an obvious example, but many people didn't flip over a 45 to listen to the b-side.

Ringo Starr's saxophone solo

The saxophone solo on "You Know My Name" is the most memorable part of the song. It's the only time in the Beatles' catalog where a single instrument can dominate a track. Starr's saxophone solo is the most prominent feature of the song, and many fans will find it a highlight of the album. The song was shortened to fit the radio broadcast, and it was edited into five sections. Its style-switching arrangement is similar to other Beatles songs, and the song predates the medley from Abbey Road. The Beatles had experimented with this concept to get the sound they wanted.

Although recorded in 1967, You Know My Name (Look Up the Number) was never released until the Let It Be single three years later. The song features silly voices and nightclub cabaret parodies. It was recorded in just a few weeks after the band completed recording of the Sgt. Pepper album and is available on the past masters album.

The Beatles' classic line-up began recording the song on May 17, 1967. Part one was recorded over fourteen takes and multiple rehearsals. The best takes included guitars, bass, drums, bongos, and handclaps. The Beatles then came back to the studio for take nine on 7 June, recording five takes totaling twenty minutes. The instrumentation for this part included electric guitar, tambourine, and flute.

In the early 1970s, the Beatles featured the saxophone on many songs. While they never played the instrument themselves, it was played by Brian Jones of the Stones. The saxophone, unfortunately, ruined many good songs.

In the summer of 1969, the Beatles started recording "Magical Mystery Tour" after recording "All You Need Is Love". They met Maharishi Mahesh Yogi on August 24th, and then headed to North Wales to study Transcendental Meditation. During this time, the Beatles began to realize that they had to take responsibility for their own lives. The Beatles never fully reunited after the breakup in 1970. John Lennon was murdered in 1980, and George Harrison died from cancer in 2001.

Editing of You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)

The Beatles' "You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)" was a song that was reworked at various stages in the band's career. Although the song was first recorded in May 1967, it was not released until April 1969. The Beatles worked continuously in the studio to complete the song. They recorded fourteen takes of the rhythm track, which would eventually become the first part of the song.

It was a b-side to the song "Let It Be" and received minimal radio airplay. The rock-n-roll-inspired "Part One" was cut to a lounge-sounding "Part 3." The song's "Part 4" is cut entirely, and the opening measures are omitted. The song's final version - Part 5" - sounds more like an English statesman.

The band began the seven-hour session with a copy of the 30 April 1969 mono mix of 'You Know My Name'. Lennon and McCartney began editing the track, reducing it from six minutes to four minutes and eight seconds. They also worked on the new mix, resulting in the stereo version of the track.

Let It Be

"You Know My Name (Look Up the Number)" was written by the English rock group the Beatles almost four years before they split up. It was originally intended to be the b-side of 'Let It Be,' the band's first UK single. However, EMI insisted that the track be released as a single instead.

"Apples 1002" was the single number given to the single in Britain. The single was scheduled for release on December 5, 1969, the same week that the Beatles' previous single "Get Back" reached #1 in the US. However, the single did not get the airplay it needed to reach the top spot in the UK.

After the release of "All You Need Is Love," the Beatles took a month-long break from the studio. On August 24th, the band met Maharishi Mahesh Yogi and went to Bangor, North Wales to study Transcendental Meditation. It was here that the band realized that they had to take responsibility for their own lives. After the death of their manager, Brian Epstein, they felt that the "You Know My Name" project was no longer appropriate.

In the early days of the Beatles, John and Paul were not the best of friends. However, they still managed to collaborate on this track and record funny bits onto the song. This resulted in a song that worked on the wrong mood. So, if you are looking for a single version, I wouldn't recommend it.

The song has many references to other musicians. During its opening section, John Lennon and Paul McCartney sing together. Later, in the 'lounge bar' section, they imitate the voices of radio show hosts. Eventually, they took over lead vocals.

The song has an eleven-measure verse followed by four sections. The third part of the song is repeated four times, while part four has a regular 4/4 beat. Towards the end, the Beatles added a vibraphone. It is one of the quirkier sound effects of the song.

The Beatles also made an instrumental version of "Part 2" that was recorded in only one take. It was recorded at EMI Studios at 2:30 AM. The song was originally in mono. This was eventually changed to stereo by the second half of 1969, when nearly all singles were released.

You Know My Name Look Up the Number

You Know My Name  Look Up the Number  Genius

You Know My Name (Look Up the Number) by The Beatles was written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and released as a single on Let It Be in 1970. It is a unique Beatles song that was recorded using a four-track microphone. Unfortunately, this song was only released in mono and not stereo, so it's not widely available. However, it is available on the classic 'Past Masters' compilation and Anthology 2.

You Know My Name (Look Up the Number)

"You Know My Name" is a song written and recorded by the Beatles. It was first released as a single from the Let It Be album in 1970. It was recorded using a four-track microphone and released only in mono. It was later included on the compilation "Past Masters" and "Anthology 2."

Its lyrics are simple enough. "If you know my name, look up the number" is repeated several times throughout. This song features John as Dennis, a moderator. He teases Dennis Oh Bell with his falsetto and pigeon whistle, as well as a piano accompaniment.

SignUpGenius

"You Know My Name" is a wonderful, weird B side to the Beatles' single "Let It Be". John Lennon and Paul recorded the song in April 1969. It's one of the most bizarre Beatles tracks, and Paul has proclaimed that it's his favorite. The song was originally going to be a single released by the Plastic Ono Band, but it ended up becoming a b-side to "Let It Be."

Queen Bee level

If you've been playing You Know My Name Look Up the Number for the past 18 months, you've probably reached the Genius level. This is the top level, and it awards the "Queen Bee" title. Once you reach Genius, you'll receive a graduation cap and receive extra points if you make a pangram. The game consists of different levels, and each level requires a different number of words. As you earn more points, you'll be able to move up one level.

To unlock the Queen Bee level, you'll need to find all the words that are on the list. This is an Easter egg, so you won't find it on the Rankings sheet. However, you can deduce the value by computing the remaining "tiers" and comparing them.

Mono and stereo versions

You Know My Name (Look Up the Number) is a song by the English rock band the Beatles. It was originally recorded in four sessions and released as the B-side of the single Let It Be. The song features a saxophone part by Rolling Stones member Brian Jones.

The original way to hear recordings was in mono. You can still hear vocal effects in both mono and stereo versions. The decision to listen to the mono or stereo version will ultimately depend on the individual. The stereo version of the song may have some additional vocal effects you don't like.

While both versions are great, some listeners find mono versions more enjoyable. There is one notable exception to this rule. The Blue Note 1500 series, which includes the "8" prefix, was originally recorded only in mono. The intention was to give the engineer more control over the final mono mix.

You Know My Name (Look Up My Number)

Images of You Know My Name  Look Up My Number Beatles

"You Know My Name (Look Up My Number)" is a song by the Beatles from 1969. This song was originally released as a b-side to the single "Let It Be." It was composed by John Lennon and Paul McCartney.

You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)

In 1970, the Beatles released "You Know My Name (Look Up the Number)" as a B-side to the hit single "Let It Be." While "Let It Be" became a #1 single and stayed at the top for two weeks, "You Know My Name" didn't achieve the same success, receiving little radio airplay and a lack of widespread popularity.

After the release of "All You Need Is Love", the Beatles took a month off from recording. On August 22nd, they began working on "Magical Mystery Tour." On the 24th, they met Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, a Transcendental Meditation master. After completing the retreat, the band rediscovered their responsibility for their own lives and their own decisions. They also felt that "You Know My Name" was an inappropriate project to finish after the death of their manager, Brian Epstein.

The Beatles recorded "Part 2" in twelve takes. During the session, Paul played piano, George and John played guitars, and Ringo played drums. However, the song didn't get a finish until several years later, when Paul and John returned to the studio.

In addition to its lyrics, the song has a memorable music structure. The song starts with a six-measure intro that is the equivalent of the closing verse of a standard verse. Ringo's drums feature a snare on two beats. John's piano chords occur on the downbeat of each measure. Paul's bass begins low and then plays a string of high notes.

The song features references to other artists. During the song "Love Me Do" includes a reference to Dennis O'Bell, who was the associate producer of the movie "A Hard Day's Night." McCartney would go on to become director of Apple Films and Publicity.

It was composed by John Lennon and Paul McCartney

"You Know My Name (Look Up My Number)" is a song by the British rock band the Beatles. The song was recorded by the classic Beatles lineup in 1967. It features John Lennon on piano and harmonica, and Ringo Starr on bongos. It also features backing vocals from George Harrison. The song was written between May 17th and April 30th of that year.

The song has a strange and unique sound to it. It was recorded in 1967, and its original version included sounds that resembled ska. The band also included a roadie named Mal Evans on alto saxophone. The track was later restored and a stereo mix was used.

"You Know My Name Look Up My Number" has strange riffs and ad-libs. The Beatles' song is a fun and entertaining song that shows how well they work together. It is a favorite among fans of the Beatles.

During the early days of the Beatles, John and Paul didn't always get along. The duo sang together around a microphone and recorded funny parts of their singing onto a quaint song. While their chemistry wasn't always the best, the song is still a fun and catchy track.

The song is a self-indulgent song written by the Beatles. It was originally written for a single and not a live performance. In the late sixties, the Beatles broke up. It was written for fun comedic reasons and never meant to be played live.

If you're a Beatles fan, you'll know that this song is one of their most popular hits. It has been played around the world, including many strange locations. Even after the band broke up, the song was still a hit.

It was recorded in 1969

The Beatles' You Know My Name (Look Up My Number) is a curious and strangely strange track. This track contains several strange riffs and ad-libs. The lyrics are also strange, with the singer introducing himself as a film producer named Dennis O'Bell.

This song was written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon, and released as the B-side of their 1970 single "Let It Be". It is the last single recorded by the Beatles before their breakup. The song was recorded on a four-track microphone, and was only available in mono. Later, it was included on the Anthology 2 compilation.

The single was not released on its own, but it was later repurposed as a b-side for a Let It Be 45. The b-side was not released because of EMI's insistence, but rather because it was cheaper for them. The track's matrix is APPLES 1002-A, and early UK pressings are the same. This indicates that the original intention was to release it as a mono track.

The song's melody is reminiscent of a nightclub. The lyric "If You Know My Name, Look Up My Number" is repeated several times. The song also features the saxophone solo by the Rolling Stones' Brian Jones.

The single's name was not changed from the original recording, but the Plastic Ono Band intended to release it under The Beatles' name. However, the release of the single was postponed. In December 1969, John Lennon announced his plans to break away from The Beatles. He did not want his band to be included on the single and did not want to cause EMI any headaches with the distribution.

The track was originally recorded in mono, and was not released until the late 1970s, but in 1996, the Beatles' manager George Martin and producer Geoff Emerick opted to release an extended stereo version of the song. This new version was released on the compilation album "Anthology 2."

It was a favourite of Paul McCartney's

Paul McCartney named You Know My Name (Look Up My Number) as his favorite Beatles song. The song was written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and was released as a single in 1970. Recorded on four-track microphones, it is the band's only mono track. It was also featured on the band's Anthology 2 compilation.

You Know My Name (Look Up My Number) was edited by John Lennon before the band released it as a single. It was originally intended to be the b-side to 'Let It Be'. The song has strange riffs and ad-libs.

"Flowers in the Dirt" was the first single from the album and is also one of Paul McCartney's favourite songs. It is more edgy than most Beatles songs and is one of his best collaborations with Elvis Costello. It is a powerful song about defiance in the face of misery.

The song was originally recorded in mono but later became available in stereo after George Martin and Geoff Emerick opted to include an extended mix. This mix restored sections of the mono single and omitted others. This caused a significant difference between the mono and stereo versions. The stereo version has a faded-out talking part, whereas the mono version does not.

"Taxman" was recorded during the Beatles' acid period. While the song was a bit of a mess, it is one of their most popular songs. It was also recorded as a b-side to the Beatles' single "Let it Be."

You Know My Name Look Up The Number Live

You Know My Name  Look Up The Number  live  YouTube

"You Know My Name" is a Beatles song written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon. It was released as the B-side to "Let It Be" and was one of the band's most famous singles. The track was recorded using four-track microphones and was originally only available in mono. Later, it was included on the "Past Masters" compilation and the Anthology 2 album.

You Know My Name (Look Up The Number) was recorded by the Plastic Ono Band

"You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)" was originally recorded in mono. In 1996, EMI insisted that the band release a stereo version. The song was later remastered and released on the "Past Masters" compilation album. The extended stereo mix restored a few portions of the song that were cut from the mono single. This resulted in several differences between the two versions. For example, the stereo version features a talking section that fades out, while the mono version does not. However, there has never been a known version of the song with all five sections uncut.

After the release of "All You Need Is Love," the Beatles took a month off from the recording studio. On August 24th, they met with Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. This meeting led them to travel to Bangor, North Wales to study Transcendental Meditation. This experience helped the Beatles understand the importance of being responsible for their own affairs. In addition, they realized that they had to take responsibility for their own lives, and they decided to put the "You Know My Name" project on hold.

The song was written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. It was recorded as a B-side to the single "Let It Be." The single became a huge hit and stayed at #1 for two weeks. This song received limited radio play, and remained unknown for a long time.

It was released as a B-side to "Let It Be"

When the Beatles released the single "Let It Be," the b-side to the hit song wasn't as well-known as the single itself. While the A-side was a big hit, many people didn't turn the 45 over to listen to the B-side. But the song has a very complicated meaning, and it transcends its original context.

It was written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, and released on the single in 1970. Although originally released in mono, an extended stereo mix was released in 1996 and restored certain parts of the song that were cut from the original mono version. These parts included the speaking portion, which fades out in the stereo version. The mono version does not include the talking section, which is the most notable difference between the two versions. The uncut version is rarely available on the market, but it can be found on the "Past Masters" compilation and the "Anthology 2" compilations.

Despite its similarity to "Let It Be," You Know My Name (Look Up The Number) was not recorded by the Beatles, and the song was edited by Lennon himself. Lennon had planned to release it as a single from The Plastic Ono Band, but EMI insisted that the single be released on its own. The single featured the a-side "You Know My Name (Look Up The Number), and the b-side, "What's the New Mary Jane."

It was Paul's favorite Beatles track

Although Paul McCartney was a member of the band during most of the group's career, his favorite song was not "Yesterday" or "Come Together." Instead, it was "You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)" which he wrote and produced in his own time in the studio between May 1967 and April 1970.

The song was originally recorded by the Beatles and edited by John Lennon. The idea to release it on its own was abandoned when EMI refused to release the single. However, it later became one of the best-selling singles of all time. It was the band's favorite track during the early '60s and a fan favorite.

While this track is not among his greatest, it is one of the Beatles' most evocative and memorable songs. McCartney, who had been reluctant to engage in politics, obliquely referenced Watergate in the song. The track's lyrics are also some of the best from McCartney's songwriting partnership with Elvis Costello.

During the early days of the Beatles, John and Paul did not get along. The song was recorded around a single microphone. In a way, it was a joke and meant to be a fun track.

It was a Plastic Ono Band single

The You Know My Name Look Up The Number single was released in December 1969 by the Plastic Ono Band, a group consisting of John Lennon and Yoko Ono. This group was formed while Lennon was still in the Beatles, but he left the group privately in late 1969. The Plastic Ono Band was formed to record two unfinished Beatles songs.

The single was actually two different Beatle outtakes: "You Know My Name", a novelty jam created by Paul and John during the Magical Mystery Tour, and "What's the New Mary Jane," a studio experiment that Yoko and John wrote during the White Album sessions. The record was initially misinterpreted by the press as a Beatles release, but Lennon was adamant that it be released as a Plastic Ono Band single.

Ono and Lennon met in 1968 and began their relationship. In 1969, Lennon proposed a collaborative project with Ono and began to make music. The pair also worked together on a few experimental albums. They credited their future projects as Plastic Ono Band songs.

Although "You Know My Name" was released on a different label, the Beatles were not happy with it. Although the Beatles' performance was identical on both sides, the Beatles were more concerned with recording their solo album. They did, however, insist on the b-side of "You Know My Name". The single was issued in a picture sleeve in the UK, and the picture sleeve was similar to that for the album. The four-member band appeared in the sleeve, and the album became a hit in the UK and USA.

It was left in a half-finished state

The song "You Know My Name" was recorded in 1967, but it's hard to say whether it ever actually made it to the final version of Abbey Road. Its quirky, comical sound would have made it a perfect candidate for the White Album, but it never made it there. In fact, the song was abandoned for nearly two years, and the Beatles returned to it only for lead vocals in April 1969.

The song was written by the Beatles almost four years before the group broke up. It was released as the B-side to their last UK single, 'Let It Be.' It was not widely known before the album, and EMI insisted that it be released.

The Beatles began recording 'You Know My Name' in May 1967. It took 14 takes and a number of rehearsals before they settled on the best take. The best take featured guitars, bass, drums, handclaps, and bongos. The Beatles then returned to the studio for take nine on 7 June. They recorded five takes that lasted twenty minutes. The song also featured a saxophone part played by Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones.

The extended stereo version of "You Know My Name (Look Up the Number)" was later included on the Beatles' Anthology 2 compilation. It was a revelation to Beatles fans. After all, "You Know My Name" was a single that lasted just a year before the Beatles broke up.

It is a style-switching Beatles song

The Beatles' You Know My Name (Look Up The Number) was recorded in 1967 by their classic lineup, which included Paul McCartney on piano, John Lennon on harmonica, Ringo Starr on bongos, and George Harrison on vibraphone. This song is similar to other style-switching Beatles works, including Abbey Road medley, and the song is also notable for containing elements from other artists. In addition to Beatles, the Rolling Stones' Brian Jones was also invited to participate in the recording.

George Harrison wrote "Hollywood Hills Street" while waiting for houseguests in 1967. While he was perfecting his psychedelic organ mood and chorus, the song was not finished yet. The song is a lost classic of Beatles weirdness, which is evident at the two-thirds mark. In addition, it was reportedly the band's most controversial song and has been dubbed the 'last train to Clarkesville'.

While the title track of You Know My Name is a classic Beatles song, "Look Up The Number" has been the band's most style-switching song. In the early days of MTV, the band remained elusive, but they still managed to reach a new audience with this song. The song also reunited Ringo Starr and George Martin, who had previously parted ways.

This style-switching Beatles song is the first song to feature an acoustic guitar solo. The song was recorded in the summer of 1967 in New York. The original recording was unfinished and Paul and John returned to finish the track several years later. Mal Evans, a Beatles roadie and assistant, was asked to play the spade sound on the song. The result was a fun track.

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